creative research gallery and drawing center
a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization

 


SEASON 16

EXHIBITS IN THE GALLERY
September 2019 - August 2020

Get on the list to receive the season-documenting hardcover anthology, the Manifest Exhibition Annual (MEA s16).

Download to save or print the entire season 16 calendar here.

Submit work to open projects here.

Find your way to the gallery, (map) here.

 
  January 24 - February 21, 2020

Preview Reception: Thursday, January 23, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, January 24, 6-9pm

For this fourth exhibit period of our 16th season Manifest has created a very special set of exhibitions—the Five Themes Project. The project comprises five concurrent shows representing themes accumulated through a survey sent to the over 3,000 Manifest exhibition alumni* from our fifteen previous seasons, collated into clusters of overarching themes, and then re-vetted through a general public feedback process. The resulting five themes were the most popular or desirable for our audience to see in the gallery and were offered as calls-for-entry internationally. 

The resulting exhibitions are listed below in order as you will see them in the five galleries at Manifest on Woodburn Avenue in East Walnut Hills (Cincinnati, Ohio). The artwork included in each exhibit was juried by Manifest's standard process involving multiple professional volunteer jurors.

main gallery

 

MUNDANE
The Ordinary Everyday


The most interesting lessons often lie in the mundane—those aspects of everyday life that locals take for granted and tourists tend to overlook. ” – Esther Dyson


There is something powerful about finding inspiration and meaning in the ordinary everyday things and spaces around us. For the artist it represents a Zen-like independence from assumed ideals, and a dexterity of mind and perception that, when practiced and shared through visual art, transfers the potent sense of appreciation to the unsuspecting viewer, like a sage gifting illumination of a higher nature.

For this exhibit 105 artists submitted 421 works from 31 states and 4 countries including England, Israel, Sweden, and the United States. Twenty works by the following 16 artists from 15 states and England were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

* For MUNDANE we would like to recognize the alumnus whose input generated the theme. Thanks go out to Mimi Sheiner (El Cerrito, CA), for contributing to the development of this exhibition concept.

Presenting works by:

Rob Anderson
Park Hills, Kentucky

Malcolm Christhilf
Springboro, Pennsylvania

Susan Cohen
New York, New York

Ryan Durrant
Huddersfield, England

Jason Ferguson
Grass Lake, Michigan

Karen Hillier
Bryan, Texas

Joshua Huyser
Shoreview, Minnesota

Marina Kassianidou
Boulder, Colorado

Dale Knaak
Sheboygan, Wisconsin

Liz Koerner
Little Rock, Arkansas

John Lee
Williamsburg, Virginia

Sean Lyman
Springfield, Missouri

Rose Mansel-Pleydell
Defiance, Ohio

Maddie Miller
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Cody Williams
Friday Harbor, Washington

Stephen Wright
Valley Village, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Susan Cohen


 

     Karen Hillier


 

     Joshua Huyser


 

     Liz Koerner


 

 

 

 

 

drawing room

 

PERIPHERAL
Edges & Boundaries


“Beyond the edge of the world there’s a space where emptiness and substance neatly overlap, where past and future form a continuous, endless loop. And, hovering about, there are signs no one has ever read, chords no one has ever heard.”

― Haruki Murakami

Limitations inspire creativity. Edges—the periphery of awareness, skill, media use, capabilities, and concepts—form the mold that creative trailblazers attempt to define, expand, and break free of. In turn new edges are created, new limitations defined. This exhibit set out to examine how artists consider the concepts of boundaries, edges, or the 'peripheral' as it relates to their creative practice and the subject, content, or form of their work.

For this exhibit 59 artists from 29 states, Washington D.C., and 5 countries including Australia, Guatemala, Oman, United Arab Emirates, and the United States submitted 218 works for consideration. Nine works by these 7 artists from 7 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

* For PERIPHERAL we would like to recognize the alumni whose input generated the theme. Thanks go out to Sara Frantz (Los Osos, CA) and Kitty Schroeder (Cincinnati, OH) for each contributing to the development of this exhibition theme.

Presenting works by:

Marc Andreo
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Blake Brasher
Lowell, Massachusetts

Bob Bruch
Oberlin, Ohio

Anita Cooke
New Orleans, Louisiana

Maki Hajikano
Forest Hills, New York

Josh Johnson
Springfield, Missouri

Neal Rock
Charlottesville, Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Bob Bruch


 

     Maki Hajikano


 

     Anita Cooke

 

 

 

 

parallel space

 

ENVIRONMENTAL
Concerning Our Place On Earth


“Despite all of our pretenses and fantasies, we always have been and will remain a biological species tied to this particular biological world. Millions of years of evolution are indelibly encoded in our genes. History without the wildlands is no history at all.” ― E. O. Wilson

Environmental awareness has crept, like a dam springing a leak, for over a century now. It seems we wallow from the depths of denial and personal narrow radii to the heights of generational concern, selflessness, and bright clarity regarding the situation at hand. What a paradox to realize that in order to live we must destroy the only thing that could sustain us. Is humanity truly a virus, insane to the point of repeating the same mistakes over and over expecting a different result? How can art and design play a role in illuminating the bigger picture, galvanizing resolve, or illustrating the task or questions at hand?

Rather than inciting shock, guilt, shame, or fear of climate change can art address emerging issues in Environmental Activism in ways that build on a common love, respect, and awe for the planet, and still make a difference? Can artists collaborate with scientific researchers and scientific data to bring compelling life and experience to ideas about the environment?

What does our culture have to say about our world moving into the Anthropocene?

For this exhibit 98 artists from 29 states and 6 countries including Australia, Canada, Finland, New Zealand, Spain, and the United States submitted 360 works for consideration. Twelve works by these 9 artists from 6 states and Canada were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

* For ENVIRONMENTAL we would like to recognize the alumni whose input generated the theme. Thanks go out to Lindsy Halleckson (Minneapolis, MN), Cathy Carter (Auckland, New Zealand), Mimi Sheiner (El Cerrito, CA), Carol Boram-Hays (Columbus, OH), Kim Turner Young (Bowling Green, OH), Jennifer Cronin (Chicago, IL), Margaret Whiting (Waterloo, IA), Meg Lagodzki (Bloomington, IN), and Debra Small (Sacramento, CA) for each contributing to the development of this exhibition theme.

 

Presenting works by:

Brooks Dierdorff
Orlando, Florida

Drew Etienne
Iowa City, Iowa

Howard Fullmer
Springville, Utah

Lynne Miller Jones
Evanston, Illinois

Chris Myhr
Hamilton, Canada

Matt Roberts
Deland, Florida

Kathleen Thum
Central, South Carolina

Margaret Whiting
Waterloo, Iowa

Dganit Zauberman
Guilford, Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Brooks Dierdorff


     Chris Myhr

 

     Margaret Whiting

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

central gallery

 

WEATHERED
Wear And Tear


“Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes. Don't resist them; that only creates sorrow. Let reality be reality. Let things flow naturally forward in whatever way they like.”
― Lao Tzu

The Japanese concept of wabi-sabi includes the appreciation for the ingenuous integrity of natural objects and processes. Time wears all things. Literally taken weathering is an aspect of the elements, but not without time. Wind, rain, sun, fire, and ice, and even mechanical means, transform everything. Weathering then is the process by which things in our world, and the world itself, are in the process of always becoming. In appreciating such processes one becomes aware of the signs of surviving age, stress, life, the toll of an ordeal or accomplishment, and existence itself. Through weathering a compelling narrative unfolds.

For this exhibit 128 artists from 34 states and 7 countries including Canada, China, Denmark, Israel, Italy, Japan, and the United States submitted 496 works for consideration. Eleven works by these 9 artists from 7 states and Italy were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

* For WEATHERED we would like to recognize the alumni whose input generated the theme. Thanks go out to Clayton Cusak (Seattle, WA) and Jon-Erik Hem (Little Egg Harbor, NJ) for each contributing to the development of this exhibition theme.

Presenting works by:

Francesco Beretta
Albese con Cassano, Italy

Rima Day
Thompson's Station, Tennessee

Jan Dickey
Bronx, New York

Megan Hanley
Portland, Oregon

Julie Herman
Liverpool, New York

Karen Hunter McLaughlin
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Kristen Mitchell
Ogden, Utah

Kathleen Taylor
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Xuanyi Wang
Louisville, Kentucky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Rima Day


 

     Megan Hanley


 

    Kristen Mitchell

 

 

 

 

north gallery

 

CHAOS
Disorder & Displacement


“Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of void but out of chaos.” ― Mary Shelly

The first and perhaps most common understanding of the word 'chaos' is that it is randomness, disorder, interference, or displacement. A more theoretical illustration is Chaos Theory, represented by the often over-simplified 'butterfly effect'—the concept whereby a butterfly flapping its wings in one place on Earth can cause a hurricane in some far distant location (underlying order in otherwise apparent disorder, revealed through cause and effect.)

Whether simple, or elegantly complex, the idea of chaos lends itself to reflection on personal life, patterns and effects of civilization now and over time, and on existence within the broader Universe. And of course it applies itself nicely to pure visual art expression, discovery, and creation as well.

For this exhibit 72 artists from 29 states, Washington D.C., and 3 countries including China, Germany, and the United States submitted 259 works for consideration. Ten works by these 10 artists from 8 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

* For CHAOS we would like to recognize the alumni whose input generated the theme. Thanks go out to Amelia Vercauteren (Baltimore, MD), Elizabeth Runyon (Oxford, OH), Vanessa Rosalia Larsen (Aalgaard, Norway), and Sally Bousquet (Boston, MA) for each contributing to the development of this exhibition theme.

Presenting works by:

Dionisio Cortes
New York, New York

Susan Czechowski
Dunlap, Illinois

Chris Flynn
Chicago, Illinois

Ryan Howerton
Topeka, Kansas

Sarah Jantzi
Valparaiso, Indiana

Kristina Key
Knoxville, Tennessee

Clive King
Sarasota, Florida

Rob Kolomyski
Woodbury, Minnesota

Bruce Riley
Chicago, Illinois

Margery Thomas-Mueller
Alton, New Hampshire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Kristina Key


 

     Bruce Riley


 

      Susan Czechowski

 

 

 


  March 6 - April 3

Preview Reception: Thursday, March 5, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, March 6, 6-9pm



  April 17 - May 15

Preview Reception: Thursday, April 16, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, April 17, 6-9pm


  May 29 - June 26

Preview Reception: Thursday, May 28, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, May 29, 6-9pm



  July 10 - August 7

Preview Reception: Thursday, July 09, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, July 10, 6-9pm



  August 14 - September 11, 2020    (SEASON 16 FINALÉ)

Preview Reception: Thursday, August 13, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, August 14, 6-9pm





 

——— END OF SEASON 16 ———


See all open calls here.




PREVIOUS SEASON 16 EXHIBITS:


  September 27 - October 25, 2018     (SEASON 16 LAUNCH) Preview Reception: Thursday, September 26, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, September 27, 6-9pm

main gallery + drawing room + parallel space

 

PAINTED 2019
4th Biennial Survey of Contemporary Painting

 

At some point many generations ago society reached a level where ordinary people could spend a lifetime perfecting their ability to mix and apply paint, in extraordinary ways. Manifest established this exhibit as a permanent biennial project in 2013 to inaugurate our expanded gallery. PAINTED 2019 is the fourth biennial presentation of this survey of contemporary painting.

PAINTED joins Drawn as a recurring gallery exhibition designed to complement our annual INDA and INPA (drawing and painting) publications. Every two years it launches our exhibition season by presenting a competitive group exhibition focused exclusively on painting.

For this exhibit 167 artists from 35 states, Canada, Greece, Singapore, and Turkey submitted 682 works. Thirty-three works by the following 26 artists from 17 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Erick Anderson
Lindenhurst, Illinois

Kim Anderson
Bradenton, Florida

Shannon Cannings
Lubbock, Texas

Gregory Carr
Detroit, Michigan

Daniel Dallmann
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

David Dorsey
Pittsford, New York

Hannah K Freeman
Morgantown, West Virginia

Jason Lee Gimbel
Denver, Colorado

Susan Hoffer
Upper Jay, New York

Donald Keefe
Ooltewah, Tennessee

Anne Lindberg
Wilmington, North Carolina

Junyi Liu
Brooklyn, New York

Perin Mahler
Laguna Beach, California

Michael McCaffrey
Lawrence, Kansas

Armin Mühsam
Kansas City, Missouri

Mihee Nahm
Grapevine, Texas

Martina Nehrling
Chicago, Illinois

Isoko Onodera
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

James Perrin
Nashville, Tennessee

Ron Prigat
Cincinnati, Ohio

Erin Raedeke
Montgomery Village, Maryland

Robert Samartino
Brooklyn, New York

Dana Saulnier
Oxford, Ohio

Carol Stewart
Columbus, Ohio

Lance Turner
Ashland City, Tennessee

Dganit Zauberman
Guilford, Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Erin Raedeke


 

     Jason Lee Gimbel


 

     Dana Saulnier


 

     Dganit Zauberman

 

 

 


central gallery

 

AQUACHROME
Contemporary Watercolor*


Quite possibly the oldest form of painting, watercolor persists today, defying narrow categorization and broad stereotype. Practiced for centuries in concept development preliminary to 'finished' paintings made in oil or other scale-worthy durable media, watercolor also found favor with botanists, illustrators, and portraitists, and was applied to varied and countless surfaces.

The nature of the media itself represents a delicate and dictatorial transparency, fluidity, and a potential for expressive spontaneity. This not only makes it an ideal vehicle for contemporary art, but also one of training, intensity, philosophy, and play for any who practice it. Where an artist can easily dominate other painting media, forcing a will through viscous layers into a work of art like taming a wild horse, with watercolor there is dialog, compromise, and undeniable forthrightness. In this way the artist practicing watercolor works with a tiger in the room.

*Along with watercolor, works in gouache, ink wash, and other similar media were accepted for consideration.

For this exhibit 52 artists from 21 states, Washington D.C., and Brazil, Canada, and Poland submitted 209 works for consideration. Fifteen works by the following 9 artists from 6  states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

Mark Adkins
Oak Park, Illinois

Andrew Arkell
Chicago, Illinois

Carrie Callihan
South Lebanon, Ohio

Steven Elbert
Columbus, Ohio

Janet Gorzegno
Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Pauline Goldsmith
Miami, Florida

Reuben Negron
Asheville, North Carolina

Julio Suarez
Jonesville, Michigan

Tanzanight
Miami, Florida

 

 

Aquachrome was last presented as part of our painting biennial in 2017. We were pleased then to announce its reinstatement as a permanent element of the biennial, and look forward to showcasing and documenting works of watercolor and related media, alongside the wider spectrum of painting, every two years.

 

 

 


     Mark Adkins


 

     Reuben Negron


 

     Steven Elbert

 

 



north gallery

 

STAY AND REMAIN
Paintings by Joe Morzuch

Joe Morzuch is an observational painter currently residing in Starkville, Mississippi. In addition to his studio work, he is an Assistant Professor at Mississippi State University where he teaches courses in foundations, painting, and drawing. In 2006 he received his MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He has taught at the college level for the past 15 years and actively exhibits his work nation-wide.

Of his work the artist states:

"As a still life painter, I am interested in the visual and communicative potential of objects that are cast off, discarded, and over-looked. Inherent to the genre is an engagement with the mundane, domestic, and every-day, as well as the notion of an arrested visual experience. These subjects, their intrinsic intimacy, and the process of working from life are rich with pictorial and conceptual possibilities...

I am concerned with the subjective nature of perception, and the challenge of translating visual information into paintings that speak of their own making as both image and object...

Time is the purview of still life painting, with its charge to hold fast as a reminder of the impermanence of all things, and is reflected in the title of this exhibition. “Stay and Remain” is a plea, referring to the act of painting, the endurance of objects, absence, love, and loss. There is something in the attempt to arrest a moment—to present an arrested moment through an accumulation of moments observed and painted—that feels necessary but also paradoxical. This work, with its forms suspended between coalescence and fragmentation, was made in an effort to reflect that paradox.

This exhibition is one of 6 selected from among 149 solo proposals submitted for consideration for Manifest’s 16th season.

 

Listen in on a podcast interview with Joe from 2014:


 

 

 

 



 


 

 

 

  November 8 - December 6

Preview Reception: Thursday, November 7, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, November 8, 6-9pm

main gallery + drawing room

 

TRANSCENDENCE
Beyond the Ordinary

tran·scend
/tran(t)ˈsend/
verb: be or go beyond the range or limits of (something abstract, typically a conceptual field or division).
surpass (a person or achievement). synonyms: go beyond, rise above, cut across

tran·scend·ence
/tran(t)ˈsendəns/ 
noun: existence or experience beyond the normal or physical level. synonyms: superiority, supremacy, predominance, preeminence, ascendancy; incomparability, matchlessness, peerlessness; excellence, greatness, magnificence, sublimity, importance

 

Something many artists strive for in their work throughout their careers—a going beyond ordinary. But what about work that addresses the idea of Transcendence as a subject, rather than an aspect of the ambition, dedication, and rigor of the artist themselves? How does visual art represent, either through subject, form, or content, a notion which, in some form or another, underlies much of human introspection and civilized activity since our earliest days as a species?

Manifest invited artists from around the world to submit works for consideration which in some way address the theme of Transcendence.

For this exhibit 83 artists submitted 292 works from 29 states, Washington D.C., and 8 countries, including Canada, Denmark, England, Puerto Rico, Russia, Singapore, Ukraine, and the United States. Twenty works by the following 13 artists from 8 states, Canada, and Denmark were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Helmut Amann
New York, New York

Cameran Ashraf
Claremont, California

Camilla Augustinus
Snekkersten, Denmark

Kevin Dotson
Carbondale, Illinois

Richard Ferncase
Corona del Mar, California

Hannah K. Freeman
Morgantown, West Virginia

Eric Heffington
Cincinnati, Ohio

Pamela Martinez
Atlanta, Georgia

Clive Moloney
Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts

Laura Noel
Atlanta, Georgia

Holly Pennington
Lakeport, Michigan

Snail Scott
Edwardsville, Illinois

Jennifer Wilson
London, Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Laura Noel


 

     Jennifer Wilson


 

     Eric Heffington


 


parallel space

 

LIGHT
Illumination, Exposure, and Brightness

“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.” ― Plato


We open our eyes to it, are born into it. So much relies on what it reveals and gives. From vision of the world around us to messages sent through fiber optics, from starlight to the sunlight without which life on Earth would not be possible, light is life, awareness, and information.

We invited artists around the world to submit works for consideration which in some way address the theme of Light.

For this exhibit 63 artists submitted 213 works from 27 states and 4 countries, Canada, England, Germany, Russia, and the United States for consideration. Nine works by these 6 artists from 5 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

Cecile Baird
Hillsboro, Ohio

Jenn Gulgren
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Heather Hartman
Knoxville, Tennessee

Joseph Holsapple
Thibodaux, Louisiana

Maddie Miller
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Erin Schaefer
Cincinnati, Ohio

 

 

 

 

 


     Erin Schaefer


 

     Maddie Miller


 

 


central gallery

 

UMBRA
Scanning Electron Micrographs by Jess Holz

Jess Holz (b. 1985) creates artworks which give the viewer a peek into invisible worlds, as well as a chance to reflect on the influence of scientific visual culture on our collective imagination. She has just received her MFA in Art+Technology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; previously she has worked in several labs and imaging facilities, gaining valuable technical experience with a number of microscopic imaging techniques. The discrepancy between what can be perceived by eye and what is imaged has fostered her fascination with perceptual systems along with the optical properties of materials. Jess actively exploits this in photography and installation.

Of her work the artist states:

"The wilderness has long symbolized unknown beasts and dangers, but it has also been a therapeutic place, a place to meet God. As a landscape, my work encapsulates the awe and terror associated with the sublime of the Romantic tradition—however, the sublime is associated with vast, expansive spaces.  My work asks the question, what of the ‘tiny sublime’?

This body of work is titled Umbra, after the darkest part of a shadow, since the worlds that I am imaging are not illuminated by light. These alien landscapes are, in fact, microsculptures incorporating insect and plant fragments, imaged by scanning electron microscopy.  Lit with electricity instead of light, the sculptures present as post-apocalyptic wilderness, with radiant glowing forms and seemingly unstable dark areas, all rendered in excruciating detail. The monstrous forms inhabiting these scenes appear massive and immense, but in reality the entire landscape is less than half a centimeter across.

This exhibition is one of 6 selected from among 149 solo proposals submitted for consideration for Manifest’s 16th season.

 

 

 

 



 


 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

DARK
Shadows, Nightscapes, and Darkness

“Look at how a single candle can both defy and define the darkness.” ― Anne Frank


We close our eyes to it, are born out of it. So much hides within it, and disappears—even us. Under our beds, in the deepest of woods, past the furthest reaches of the Universe, there lies the dark. It is the unknown, the opposite of light—the impossible paradoxical weight reciprocal to the speed of light itself. Darkness saturates existence, gifting the insight brought by contrast. Therefore, perhaps, it somehow serves as a source for happiness and even light itself.

We invited artists from around the world to submit works for consideration which in some way address the theme of Dark, including any manner of interpretation, from literal to symbolic and philosophical.

For this exhibit 103 artists submitted 359 works from 30 states, Washington D.C., and 5 countries, including Canada, England, Israel, Poland and the United States for consideration. Seventeen works by these 15 artists from 11 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Andrew Arkell
Chicago, Illinois

Susan Bryant
Clarksville, Tennessee

Jacob Crook
Starkville, Mississippi

Donovan Entrekin
Flint, Michigan

Donald Furst
Wilmington, North Carolina

Alexandra Gataeva
Rochester, New York

Kenneth Hall
Cedar Falls, Iowa

Joseph Kameen
Graniteville, South Carolina

Jordan Kornreich
Starkville, Mississippi

William Linthicum
Cincinnati, Ohio

Andrew Mullally
Sycamore, Illinois

Elsa Munoz
Chicago, Illinois

Ron Prigat
Cincinnati, Ohio

Lisa Rickard
Boynton Beach, Florida

Duat Vu
Springfield, Missouri

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Jacob Crook


 

     Kenneth Hall


 

     Elsa Munoz


 

 

December 13, 2019 - January 10, 2020

Preview Reception: Thursday, December 12, 7-9pm
Public Opening: Friday, December 13, 6-9pm

main gallery + drawing room

 

TIME BOMBS
Art About Anxiety & Impending Disaster

“Present fears are less than horrible imaginings.” – William Shakespeare


We live in a world increasingly enervated by the sense that at any moment everything could change, generally for the worse. Individuals, communities, political subcultures, social media spheres, even whole countries are each, it would seem, a ticking time bomb...

Where is the fuse, the key or trigger? How can we detect and diffuse such intense energy-pockets bent on total destruction? Anxiety and fear are like a virus. Perhaps the solution is to acknowledge, examine, and then contain and discard them. Maybe art can help with this by providing an encapsulation of the subject, something that safely externalizes the issue, providing release. And maybe Time is the key...

Manifest invited artists from around the world to submit works for consideration which in some way address the theme of anxiety or impending disaster.

For this exhibit 124 artists submitted 421 works from 30 states, Washington D.C., and 3 countries, including Canada, England, and the United States. Twenty-three works by the following 18 artists from 14 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

James Allen
Williamstown, Massachusetts

Jane Barrow
St. Louis, Missouri

Heather Lee Birdsong
Portland, Oregon

Beth Blake
Greenville, North Carolina

Donna Garcia
Alpharetta, Georgia

Kevin Haran
Oviedo, Florida

Nick Hewlett
Memphis, Tennessee

Devan Horton
Southgate, Kentucky

Zach Mory
Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Mary Nees
Johnson City, Tennessee

Melissa Nunez
Gainesville, Florida

Anna Pamasa
Chicago, Illinois

Deborah Rockman
Grand Rapids, Michigan

Gary Schmitt
Indianapolis, Indiana

Jovan Karlo Villalba
Miami, Florida

Stephen Winiecki
New York, New York

Anderson Wrangle
Clemson, South Carolina

Manuel Zamudio
Mcallen, Texas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Heather Lee Birdsong


 

     Jane Barrow


 

     Kevin Haran


 

     Melissa Nunez


 

 

 

 


parallel space

 

BUG-INSECTUM
Art About Bugs


“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.”
― Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis

The number of insect species on our planet is believed to be between six and ten million. While spiders are not insects, our exhibit is titled in order to include them (of which there are estimated to be 35,000 different species), as well as any other similar creature one may call a 'bug'.

For many people, bugs are notorious. They freak people out, even the ones that don't readily sting, bite, or infect. Some do massive damage to people, other animals, homes, and each other. But by and large they are the dominant denizens of this planet, mysterious and ubiquitous. Perhaps we are lucky they tolerate us at all. This show honors them, both in all seriousness and in light-hearted play. After all, without them we'd likely not be here at all.

Manifest invited artists to submit works which in some way address the theme of Bugs, including any and all insects, spiders, and similar creatures large and small, real or imagined.

For this exhibit 81 artists from 34 states and Washington, D.C. submitted 271 works for consideration. Eleven works by these 9 artists from 9 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

Matthew Dercole
Hartford, Connecticut

Robert Long
Flagstaff, Arizona

Benjamin Montague
Cincinnati, Ohio

Dale Marie Muller
Roberts, Montana

Steve Nyktas
Indianapolis, Indiana

Shelby Shadwell
Laramie, Wyoming

Madeline Rile Smith
Rochester, New York

Amber Tyler-Elliott
Fayetteville, North Carolina

Chris Woodman
Easthampton, Massachusetts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


     Matthew Dercole


 

     Amber Tyler-Elliott


 

     Shelby Shadwell

 

 

 


central gallery

 

ONE 10
The 10th Annual Manifest Prize

CELEBRATING A DECADE OF PROVIDING THIS AWARD TO ARTISTS MAKING EXCEPTIONAL ART!

The Cartographer
mixed media, 39'' x 132' x 104", 2019

by Damon Mohl (Crawfordsville, Indiana)

Late in the day, near a great murder of crows,
Halvorson deserted the last of his ambition.
Emptying his rucksack, he sat down on the frozen ground.
Cartographic tools and piles of maps scattered everywhere,
along with many notations and illustrations
I could scarcely comprehend.

He quietly said,
here…in relation…to there.

Then he gathered his last clear voice and proclaimed,
I have discovered a cave.
I have been surveying its depths,
and I shall spend the rest of my days there.

I asked what of his family?

He replied, they are waiting for me, in the heart of the cave.

 

Damon Mohl (b.1974) is a filmmaker and interdisciplinary artist. His work bridges drawing, painting, collage, and sculpture with digital technology to create experimental as well as narrative-based films and works of art. He received his BFA in drawing and painting from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia and his MFA from the University of Colorado, Boulder. With a focus on filmmaking, his graduate thesis film was nominated for a Student Academy Award in the experimental category. He exhibits his work nationally, and internationally his films have screened in over thirty countries. He is currently serving as an assistant professor of art at Wabash College in Indiana.

ABOUT THE $5000 MANIFEST PRIZE

Three seasons ago our board of directors increased the Manifest Prize to $5000. This underscored our non-profit organization's desire to reward, showcase, celebrate, and document exceptional artwork being made today by working artists, and to do this in a tasteful non-commercial public context. Manifest's mission is centered on championing the importance of quality in visual art, supporting and encouraging artists at all levels. This project is one aspect of the realization of that mission.

We respect the creative principle of reduction (the blind jury process) as it is employed to achieve an essential conclusive statement for each exhibit we produce. This is what has led to the high caliber of each Manifest exhibit, and to the gallery's notable following. We believe competition does inspire excellence. Therefore we determined eight years ago to launch the Manifest Prize in order to push the process to the ultimate limit—from among many to select just ONE work.

Manifest's jury process for the 10th Annual Manifest Prize included multiple levels of jury review of 873 works by 192 artists from 41 states, and 12 countries including Australia, Canada, England, Georgia, Germany, Israel, Malaysia, New Zealand, South Korea, Taiwan, Ukraine, and the United States. The jury consisted of a total of 17 different volunteer jurors from across the U.S. Each level of the process resulted in fewer works passing on to the next, until a winner was reached. The size and physical nature of the works considered was not a factor in the jury scoring and selection.

It should be noted that the winner and finalists, 11 works, represent the top scoring 1% of the jury pool. The winner represents the top one-tenth of 1% of the jury pool.

The winning work will be presented in Manifest's Central Gallery from December 12, 2019 through January 10, 2020. It will be accompanied by excerpts from juror statements and the artist's statement.

The Runners-up:

The Artists of the Ten Runner-up / Finalist Works: Tamie Beldue (Black Mountain, North Carolina), Patty Carroll (Chicago, Illinois), Tatana Kellner (Kingston, New York), Damon Mohl (Crawfordsville, Indiana), Saritdikhun Somasa (Johnson City, Tennessee), Kelsey Stephenson (Edmonton, Canada), Duat Vu (Springfield, Missouri), Victor Wang (St Louis, Missouri).*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

10th Annual TAPPED
Artists and their Professors

 

The relationship between artists and their current or former instructors can be a powerful one. Even when this bond is left unstated, we carry our professors' voices forward in time as we mature as artists and people. We eventually realize that the instruction given by our teachers during our relatively brief careers as students continues to expand within us. We realize that the learning they inspired (or insisted upon) is a chain-reaction process that develops across our lifetime. All of us who have been students carry forward our teachers' legacy in one form or another. And those who are, or have been teachers, bear witness to the potency of studenthood.

Out of respect for this artist-teacher bond, and in honor of instructors working hard to help artists tap into a higher mind relative to art and life, Manifest is proud to celebrate a decade of presenting TAPPED, an annual exhibit that presents paired works of art by current or former artist/teacher pairs.

For this exhibit 77 artists submitted 260 works from 33 states for consideration. Sixteen works by these 16 artists from 12 states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Virginia, were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication. The artists are listed in pairings to illustrate their teacher/student relationship (past or present). Works on view will include paintings, drawings, and photographs. The exhibition layout is planned so that each pair of artists' works will be shown side-by-side or in close proximity. Visitors will be able to enjoy the variety of types of works while also considering the nature of influence between professor and student.

It is worth noting also that a number of the artists in the 'former student' category are now themselves working as professors.

 

 

Professor Student

Laurie Klein
Providence, Rhode Island

Nicole Cudzilo*
Santa Fe, New Mexico
Vianna Szabo
Romeo, Michigan
Shannon Fody
Hazel Park, Michigan
Karey Walter
Marietta, Georgia

Kendall Greene*
Roswell, Georgia

Sam King
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Kellie Lehr
Fayetteville, Arkansas

Tim Kennedy
Bloomington, Indiana

Jordan Kornreich
Starkville, Mississippi

John Ferry
Prairie Village, Kansas

Cece Martin*
Grants Pass, Oregon
John Berry
Greencastle, Indiana
Mack Sikora*
Brookline, Massachusetts
Elana Hagler
Pike Road, Alabama
Laura Vahlberg
Roanoke, Virginia
* current student  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




John Berry

Mack Sikora*

Karey Walter

Kendall Greene*

Vianna Szabo

Shannon Fody

Elana Hagler

Laura Vahlberg






    

Manifest's 16th season is funded in part by a grant from the Robert H. Reakirt Foundation, PNC Bank, Trustee. This season's programming is also supported by an impact grant from ArtsWave, by a sustainability grant from the Ohio Arts Council, and through the generous contributions of individual supporters who care deeply about the visual arts.


gallery hours:

tues-fri noon-7pm, sat noon-5pm
(or by special appointment)

closed Sun and Mon

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gallery map
2727 woodburn avenue
cincinnati, ohio 45206


drawing center map
4905 whetsel avenue
cincinnati, ohio 45227


   

 


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