creative research gallery and drawing center
a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization

 


SEASON 18

EXHIBITS IN THE GALLERY
September 2021 - August 2022



This exhibition season was financially assisted in-part by the Josephine S. Russell Charitable Trust, PNC Bank, Trustee.

 

Pre-order the season-documenting hardcover anthology, the Manifest Exhibition Annual (MEA s18).

Download to save or print the entire season 18 calendar here.

Submit work to open projects here.

Find your way to the gallery, (map) here.

 

 

May 27 - June 24, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, May 26, 7-9pm
(GET TICKETS HERE)

Public Opening: Friday, May 27, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, June 23, 2022, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION   (TICKETS AVAILABLE HERE)

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here for full screen view)


main gallery

 

RITES OF PASSAGE
18th Annual Emerging Artists Exhibit


An Exhibit of Works by Current or Recent Undergraduates.

Initiated in 2005, The Rites of Passage exhibits were developed to support student excellence by offering a public venue for the display of advanced creative research, to promote young artists as they transition into their professional careers, and to bring the positive creative energies of national institutions together in one place. 

With this eighteenth annual installment of the Rites series, Manifest offers a $500 best of show prize to reward excellence at this early career level, as well as a non-monetary Director's Choice Award. 

The Rites call for submissions was open to students graduating or expecting to graduate in 2021, 2022, or 2023 (undergraduate juniors, seniors, and those who graduated last year). 

For this exhibit 72 artists representing 52 academic institutions in 27 states submitted 253 works for consideration. Eleven works by the following 9 artists from 8 states representing 8 different academic institutions are featured in the 18th annual Rites of Passage exhibit.* Artists are listed with their academic status as of the dates of their entry into this competition. 
 

Why is this important? 
Passing through an accredited college art program is one way among many to become an artist. While it does not guarantee success, it does serve as a measurable achievement, and if the degree granting institution is holding up its end of the deal, each artist who attains a degree through such a program has met or surpassed certain standards. For programs which are appropriately rigorous, passing a student is seriously meaningful business. Manifest's Rites of Passage is meant to serve as an external view into this process, across a broader scope than just one institution, and is offered as a bridge between academic pursuit and the general public. 

The nine early exhibit catalogs for Rites, and now the Manifest Exhibition Annuals, have over time become a compelling document framing a view into the state of art in academia, and quite possibly the launching place for future notable artists of the world.

 

Featuring works by:

Austin Dawes
Senior, Oklahoma State University

Jason Dorler
2021 Graduate, University of West Florida

Etta Gallaway
Junior, Bowling Green State University

Forrest Hensley
Senior, Edinboro University

Ruoxi Hua
Senior, The College of William and Mary

Jason Lindsay
Senior, Winthrop University

Grace Misko
Junior, Bowling Green State University

Reagan Profit
2021 Graduate, University of Kentucky

Samuel Stoddard
Junior, Utah Valley University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Etta Gallaway


 

     Jason Lindsay


 

    Samuel Stoddard

 

 


 

drawing room

 

MIMIC
Works About Replication & Simulation

Are there trustworthy reasons for trying to appear as something that you are not? 

In nature, mimicry allows certain creatures to survive: hiding via camouflage, or deterring predators by baring poisonous colors. Creating an illusion through verisimilitude is a foundational part of all kinds of art, and reflects the skill and sensitivity of the maker. 

Mimicry implies a reverence for life; successful imitation requires knowing what it copies well.

How do you choose which aspects of an original that you want to simulate? What are the essential qualities of liquid that an animator should study, in order to re-create it on screen? What cadences and mannerisms does an actor re-interpret to call up a person? Which movements are most important for a prosthetic limb to perform? 

What does mimicry reveal about the original? Is the illusion even better than the original? 

MIMIC is an exhibition about replication, simulation, and the relationship between life and illusion.

For this exhibit 54 artists submitted 195 works from 29 states and 2 countries, Canada and the United States. Sixteen works by the following 12 artists from 10 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

John Anderson
Florence, Massachusetts

Leslie Berns
Hudson, New York

Janet Bogart
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Dylan DeWitt
West Hartford, Connecticut

Julie Gray
Saco, Maine

Sharon Harms
Nashville, Tennessee

Ron Isaacs
Lexington, Kentucky

Betsy Morningstar
Windsor Mill, Maryland

Steve Novick
Somerville, Massachusetts

Aaron Pickens
Greentown, Indiana

Holly Ross
Saginaw, Michigan

Katherine Rumminger
Greenwood, South Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Katherine Rumminger


 

     Dylan DeWitt


 

 

parallel space

 

MAGNITUDE SEVEN
18th Annual Small Works Exhibit

An exhibit of works from across the U.S. and Germany, each no larger than about 7" in size.

Back in 2005 we launched the Magnitude Seven project with the idea that small works would be easier and more practical for artists to send to Manifest in Cincinnati from anywhere in the world. This proved true, and right off it was this exhibit that lead to Manifest earning the tag line 'the neighborhood gallery for the world.' 

Inevitably MAG 7 is a wild and varied mix of works, including an extreme range of media, styles, and artist intents. The exhibit always gains unity from the common scale, so even disparate works seem to engage in playful and tolerant conversation across the gallery or side by side. We have found that having a gallery full of hand-sized works is a joyful experience of small things well made, a menagerie of creativity, and a poignant reminder that bigger is not always better. 

We are happy to offer this eighteenth annual exhibit of works no larger than seven inches in any dimension!

For this exhibit 131 artists submitted 504 works from 31 states and 9 countries, Canada, China, England, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia, Slovenia, Switzerland, and the United States. Eighteen works by the following 15 artists from 9 states and Germany were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

Rob Anderson
Villa Hills, Kentucky

Stephanie Berrie
Cincinnati, Ohio

John DeHoog
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Daniel DeLuna
Rochester, New York

Simone DiLaura
New York, New York

Mark Eisendrath
Baltimore, Maryland

Gila Epshtein
Berlin, Germany

Frederick Fochtman
Columbus, Ohio

Kelsey Giroux
Cheyenne, Wyoming

Trey Hock
Kansas City, Missouri

Robert Levy
New York, New York

Russ Revock
Cleveland, Ohio

Dane Schumacher
Appleton, Wisconsin

Lawrence Tarpey
Lexington, Kentucky

Eduardo Valdes
Riverview, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Rob Anderson


 

     Daniel DeLuna


 

     Trey Hock



 


central gallery

 

MAR 2021/22
Manifest Artist Residency Showcase Exhibition

SPACE BLANKETS
Drawings by Shelby Shadwell

The year-long Manifest Artist Residency was launched in 2012 with the goal to provide artists with a combination of free studio space, supportive resources such as teaching opportunities and free access to life drawing and other programs at the Manifest Drawing Center, the compelling creative culture that permeates all Manifest programs, and routine engagement with the visiting public during each of our nine exhibit periods each season. To cement their year of development each artist receives another benefit of the program–a MAR Showcase solo exhibition.

This solo exhibit features works made by our 2021/22 Artist in Residence, Shelby Shadwell. This marks the culmination of Shelby's residency at Manifest which officially concludes in June. The exhibit serves as a celebration of his achievements and adoption into the growing list of Manifest residency alumni.

 

Shelby Shadwell is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Wyoming. Born and raised in Springfield, Missouri, Shelby received his BFA in 2003 from Washington University in St. Louis and his MFA in 2006 from Southern Illinois University Carbondale.      

A two-time recipient of the Visual Arts Fellowship from the Wyoming Arts Council, Shelby actively exhibits across the nation. His more recent exhibitions include LIKE AND SHARE IF YOU AGREE!!!, a solo show at the South Bend Museum of Art, DRAWN at Manifest Creative Research Gallery in Cincinnati, OH, and DRAWING DISCOURSE at the University of North Carolina Asheville. Shelby was awarded a solo exhibition at the APEX Space at the Portland Art Museum in OR in 2016, and his work is included in their permanent collection.      

For his research sabbatical from 2021-2022, Shelby accepted the Manifest Artist Residency Award, and he has been very productive making new work in the Residency studio and collaborating on educational opportunities at the Drawing Center in Cincinnati, Ohio since July 2021.

 

Of his work the artist states:

"I am making large scale charcoal and pastel drawings of space blankets (aka solar blankets, emergency blankets, thermal blankets, etc) which are made of a compact lightweight material used to regulate temperatures of things like spacecraft and human beings in particularly cold circumstances. One might see them packed in a first aid kit for camping or, more poignantly in recent years, wrapped around migrants detained in camps near the border between the US and Mexico. While the material is cheap and flimsy, it has a brilliant sparkling appearance reminiscent of precious stones or metals, thus evoking a comparison to “fool’s gold”. The subject also maintains themes from previous bodies of work such as how the representation of the abstract folds and contours in the material can evoke pareidolia, or the perception of recognizable form in a random conglomeration or formation of things. I maintain an interest in the implications of how the human mind, as a kind of inference engine, seeks to find patterns where they may or may not exist."

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

MAR 2021/22
Manifest Artist Residency Showcase Exhibition

In The Stillness We Sit
Drawings and Objects by Ed Erdmann

The year-long Manifest Artist Residency was launched in 2012 with the goal to provide artists with a combination of free studio space, supportive resources such as teaching opportunities and free access to life drawing and other programs at the Manifest Drawing Center, the compelling creative culture that permeates all Manifest programs, and routine engagement with the visiting public during each of our nine exhibit periods each season. To cement their year of development each artist receives another benefit of the program–a MAR Showcase solo exhibition.

This solo exhibit features works made by our 2021/22 Artist in Residence, Ed Erdmann. This marks the culmination of Ed's residency at Manifest which officially concludes in June. The exhibit serves as a celebration of his year-long journey and adoption into the growing list of Manifest residency alumni.

 

Ed Erdmann is a United States artist originally from Menomonie, Wisconsin. He has been based in Cincinnati, Ohio since 2020 when he joined Manifest’s Scholar in Residence program, and continued on through a second year as a Manifest Artist in Residence. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Wisconsin, Stout. Ed's work investigates the landscape and its relation to human mortality and myth. Through exploration of natural forces, he looks for ways of integrating those forces into his work. Wind, plants, trees, rivers, and soil all are active elements that find their way into his paintings and drawings. Ed's work has been shown in solo and group shows locally and regionally in places such as: Wisconsin Public Radio, Watermark Art Center, Bemidji, MN, and Madison Museum of Contemporary Art in Madison WI.

 

Of his work the artist states:

"Lines connect us to each other, acquaintances, friends, and family. Lines relate to the geological layering that stacks over millions of years. Trees cast lines across the sky or shadows onto the ground. Books are filled with lines. Words, paragraphs, and pages make up the geological history of our written word the same way stone, sand, and clay make up geological history.    

Time has power. Like Sisyphus, the Earth is bound to cycles. The landscape speaks softly. Time is an arrow. Once it is loosed from the bow it will not stop until it hits the ground. Our human mortality acts in the same way.

The landscape speaks honestly.   

Death is real. We, in varying degrees, have to wade through the mucky banks of mortality. All things need time to grow and become what they are. My work grows and changes through the restriction of control within the seasons. The weather calibrates the work that I make.   

This work is based in observation. It is often a quiet and personal action. Through walks, I find connections to landscape and meditation in the stillness. The repetition and changing nature of seasonal weather guides the choices and materials that I use. Like a prayer, I repeat patterns, forms, and actions."

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

July 8 - August 5, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, July 7, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, July 8, 6-9pm



  August 12 - Sept. 9, 2022   
  SEASON 18 FINALÉ

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, August 11, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, August 12, 6-9pm



PREVIOUS SEASON 18 EXHIBITS:

Season 18 Launch!
September 24 - October 22, 2021  

Ticketed Preview:
Thursday, Sept. 23, 7-9pm
—————–
Public Opening: Friday, Sept. 24, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, October 21, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


main gallery + drawing room + north gallery

 

PAINTED 2021
5th Biennial Survey of Contemporary Painting

 

At some point many generations ago society reached a level where ordinary people could spend a lifetime perfecting their ability to mix and apply paint, in extraordinary ways. Manifest established this exhibit as a permanent biennial project in 2013 to inaugurate our expanded gallery. PAINTED 2021 is the fifth biennial presentation of this survey of contemporary painting.

PAINTED joins Drawn as a recurring gallery exhibition designed to complement our annual INDA and INPA (drawing and painting) publications. Every two years it launches our exhibition season by presenting a competitive group exhibition focused exclusively on painting.

For this exhibit 152 artists submitted 617 works from 33 states and 5 countries, Canada, England, Israel, Singapore, and the United States. Thirty-two works by the following 27 artists from 15 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Erick Anderson
Ingleside, Illinois

David Andree
Fayetteville, Arkansas

David Baird
Birmingham, Alabama

Matthew Ballou
Columbia, Missouri

Brigham Dimick
Edwardsville, Illinois

David Dorsey
Pittsford, New York

Mark Hanavan & Paul Loehle
Middletown, Ohio

Chris Krupinski
Maineville, Ohio

Dustin London
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Robert McCann
East Lansing, Michigan

Susan Palmisano
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Norton Pease
Statesboro, Georgia

Ann Piper
Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania

David Pjecha
Kansas City, Missouri

Bruce Riley
Chicago, Illinois

Marc Ross
Columbus, Ohio

Lauren Sanderfer
Louisville, Kentucky

Benjamin Shamback
Mobile, Alabama

Ben Steele
Smyrna, Georgia

Hilary Swingle
Sandy, Utah

Laura Truitt
Yellow Springs, Ohio

Lance Turner
Ashland City, Tennessee

Jessica Mia Vito
Dundee, Michigan

Shaun C Whiteside
Radford, Virginia

Mirabel Wigon
Modesto, California

Caitlin Winner
Craryville, New York

Dganit Zauberman
Guilford, Connecticut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     David Baird


 

     Ann Piper


 

     Lance Turner


 

     Caitlin Winner

 

 

 

 


parallel space

 

AQUACHROME
Contemporary Watercolor*


Quite possibly the oldest form of painting, watercolor persists today, defying narrow categorization and broad stereotype. Practiced for centuries in concept development preliminary to 'finished' paintings made in oil or other scale-worthy durable media, watercolor also found favor with botanists, illustrators, and portraitists, and was applied to varied and countless surfaces.

The nature of the media itself represents a delicate and dictatorial transparency, fluidity, and a potential for expressive spontaneity. This not only makes it an ideal vehicle for contemporary art, but also one of training, intensity, philosophy, and play for any who practice it. Where an artist can easily dominate other painting media, forcing a will through viscous layers into a work of art like taming a wild horse, with watercolor there is dialog, compromise, and undeniable forthrightness. In this way the artist practicing watercolor works with a tiger in the room.

*Along with watercolor, works in gouache, ink wash, and other similar media were accepted for consideration.

For this exhibit 60 artists submitted 242 works from 25 states, Puerto Rico and 4 countries, China, England, Malaysia, and the United States. Sixteen works by the following 12 artists from 10 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.


Presenting works by:

Byron Anway
Lincoln, Nebraska

Scott Espeseth
Madison, Wisconsin

Ivan Fortushniak
Indiana, Pennsylvania

Jang soon Im
Long Island City, New York

Caylin Jayde
Cedar Falls, Iowa

Soyoung Jung
West Lafayette, Indiana

Zdenko Krtic
Auburn, Alabama

Chris Krupinski
Maineville, Ohio

Monika Malewska
Huntingdon, Pennsylvania

Siobhan McBride
Staten Island, New York

Margi Weir
Detroit, Michigan

Caomin Xie
Brookhaven, Georgia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Jang soon Im


 

     Scott Espeseth


 

     Soyoung Jung


 

 

 

 


central gallery

 

Raygun Gothic
Paintings by Jason Bly

Jason Bly resides in Wichita Falls, TX. He is Assistant Professor of Art at Midwestern State University where he has taught painting and drawing since 2017. He also serves as a member on the board of the Texas Association of Schools of Art. His previous experience includes teaching at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (2007-2017) and Lewis and Clark Community College (2007-2017).  Bly also served as Director of Exhibitions at the Edwardsville Arts Center (2013-2017). His paintings have been shown in solo, invitational, and juried exhibitions. He holds his MFA in painting from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and MA and BA degrees in painting and printmaking from Eastern Illinois University.

Of his work the artist states:

"In my paintings, I examine the present day through the lens of past predictions dating from the 1950's - 1980's. These forecasts, found in scientific journals and science fiction, saw beyond the year 2000 to a variety of outcomes whether hopeful or fearful of the future. Some theorists wrote of the potential for space travel, new technologies, and stability of life while others predicted a darker turn in nuclear annihilation, fear of the unknown, and a continuing lack of resources. Now that we exist within this future, we are able to see that very few of those outcomes took place directly, yet they set into public awareness the dangers and positive innovations that were becoming possible as time advanced. So, while neither prediction was necessarily true, elements of each did occur. I am interested in portraying these fantastic events alongside painted representations of everyday household items that act as symbolic tokens and serve as access points to the intangible.

Through painting elements that are both real and unreal, I engage in the painting's ability to stimulate not just the sense of sight but also that of touch.

This exhibition was selected from among 128 proposals submitted in consideration for Manifest’s 18th season.

 

 

 

 

 



 


 

 

 

 

November 5 - December 3, 2021  

Ticketed Preview (get tickets here): Thursday, Nov. 4, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, Nov. 5, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, December 2, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION (TICKETS AVAILABLE HERE)

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


main gallery

 

MISFITS
Works that Don't Conform

 

mis·fit
noun 

: something that is the wrong shape or size or is inappropriate

: a person whose behavior or attitude sets them apart from others in an uncomfortably conspicuous way

We offered this call to artists for their works that somehow represent, through their form, style, subject matter, construction, or context, the wonderful quality of being misfit, ill-fitted, non-conforming, odd or unusual in some way.

For this exhibit 87 artists submitted 310 works from 29 states and 2 countries, Canada and the United States. Thirteen works by the following 11 artists from 9 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Cassidy Ely
Richmond, Kentucky

Robert Jones
Ypsilanti, Michigan

Florence Liu
Chicago, Illinois

Bobbi Meier
Gary, Indiana

Brett S. Poza
Ashburnham, Massachusetts

Oliver Ray
Cleveland, Ohio

Katherine Rumminger
Liberty, South Carolina

Zak Smoker
Cleveland, Ohio

John Swartwout
Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin

Kalin Thomas
Burlington, Vermont

Travis Townsend
Lexington, Kentucky

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Oliver Ray


 

     Kalin Thomas


 


drawing room + parallel space

 

SIGNAL
Signs, Symbols, Icons


Throughout history signs and signification have been important in the study of philosophy and psychology. For the Greeks, "signs" occurred in the world of nature, and "symbols" in the world of culture. (For example, Plato and Aristotle explored the relationship between signs and the world.) A sign is defined as anything that communicates a meaning that is not the sign itself to the sign's interpreter. (extracted from wikipedia)

Signs, symbols, icons, indices, numerals, and other such forms of communication operate at an almost subliminal level in our society today, including in the form of these very words you read. We take their nature, their existence even, for granted. It is this that gives them their power, their potency as aspects of the human exchange of knowledge, ideas, expression, and energy. 

With this in mind we offered this call to artists for their works that feature or explore signs, symbols, icons, indices, numerals, and other semiotic phenomenon in some way. The inclusion of the subject of 'signs, etc.' may be overt and specifically about the concept, or subtle and circumstantial.

For this exhibit 95 artists submitted 369 works from 34 states. Twenty-one works by the following 14 artists from 11 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Jeffrey Baykal-Rollins
Westport, Connecticut

Ann Clarke
Syracuse, New York

Neal Cox
Nacogdoches, Texas

Andrew Heath
Hollis, New Hampshire

William Karaffa
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Jean Mandeberg
Olympia, Washington

Steve Novick
Somerville, Massachusetts

Rhea Nowak
Oneonta, New York

Claudia O'Steen
Rock Hill, South Carolina

Brett S. Poza
Ashburnham, Massachusetts

Billy Renkl
Clarksville, Tennessee

Marc Ross
Columbus, Ohio

Hanna Sosin
Cincinnati, Ohio

Kalin Thomas
Burlington, Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Jeffrey Baykal-Rollins


 

     Billy Renkl


 

     Brett S. Poza


 

 

 

 


central gallery

 

Family Album
Paintings & Drawings by Michael McCaffrey

Michael McCaffrey received a BFA degree from the University of Kansas in 2006 and an MFA in painting from Indiana University in 2008. In the winter of 2016, Michael was awarded a two-week residency at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts.

Michael exhibits both regionally and nationally, recently with a solo exhibition at the Lawrence Arts Center in Lawrence, KS, a group exhibition at the Leedy-Voulkos Arts Center in Kansas City, MO, and nationally at the 12th Annual International Drawing Discourse Exhibition at the University of North Carolina-Ashville. Michael's work is also published in Manifest Gallery's International Painting Annuals #5 and #9. In 2015 he received an international grant from the Elizabeth Greenshields foundation. This year (2021) he has been awarded a Fellowship to attend Ballinglen Arts Foundation in North County Mayo, Ireland in 2023.

From 2014-2017 Michael functioned as the Artist-in-Residence in Hashinger Hall at the University of Kansas. Currently, he is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of Visual Art at the University of Kansas where he teaches all forms of Painting, Drawing and Life Drawing. He has chickens and cats, and enjoys eating bagels with his father in the park on Sunday mornings. 

Of his work the artist states:

"Six years ago, after my mother's death, I returned to my hometown of Lawrence, Kansas. Since that time, I have explored themes of Family, Place, History, and Death. Most of my work begins with a series of observations of a specific space, such as my father’s kitchen, or his dining room table. Additionally, I’'m fascinated with the family albums my mother kept while she was alive. Viewing these photographs causes a disconnect within me. The images from these albums represent my history and lineage, but I have no recollection of these moments. To connect with a past I often feel left out of, I work to re-record and translate these images into paint, paper, and charcoal. These materials are familiar, tangible, and real. I can feel them, their materiality makes these memories real.       

As I work, I struggle with a balancing act of observation and artifice. I allow the work to migrate into a meditative, invented, and intuitive place. I oscillate between accurate visual representation and invented abstract forms. Shapes come together; recognizable forms materialize, then fall apart or become distorted. As this process unfolds, I hope to create a layered accumulation of paint and memories, a woven tapestry that captures a deeper and holistic view of my family’'s past and present. In these works, I hope to observe some personal truth about my memory, my family, and my place in it.

This exhibition was selected from among 128 proposals submitted in consideration for Manifest’s 18th season.

 

 

 

 

 



 


 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

EPIPHANIES
Mixed Media & Alternative Processes

 

Like alchemists, artists walk the line between science, poetry, chemistry, and spirituality—usually steeped in history, but also crafting it moment by moment. Often our intuition, or the needs of our ideas, take us in a direction that is unexpected in an otherwise orderly, perhaps even traditional process. Materials merge, accidents occur, realizations are had—all affecting the magic of the work at hand, leading to epiphany.

In honor of the effort of searching, invention, and discovery by artists charting new paths we offered this call to artists for their works that represent mixed media or creation through alternative processes.

For this exhibit 64 artists submitted 268 works from 20 states and 3 countries, Brazil, Canada, and the United States. Thirteen works by the following 12 artists from 9 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Kirsten Ator
Brooklyn, New York

Sara Gallagher
Nicasio, California

Andrew Hardin
Louisville, Kentucky

Karen Hillier
Bryan, Texas

David Janesko
Houston, Texas

Mary Johnson
Denton, Texas

Sarah Knight
St. Louis, Missouri

Kathy Lovas
Dallas, Texas

Dereck Mangus
Baltimore, Maryland

Jane Nodine
Spartanburg, South Carolina

Heather Parrish
Iowa City, Iowa

Kitty Schroeder
Cincinnati, Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Heather Parrish


 

     Kirsten Ator


 

December 10 - January 7, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, Dec. 9, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, Dec. 10, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, January 6, 2022, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION (GET TICKETS HERE)

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


main gallery + drawing room

 

TONDO
Works Featuring the Circle

 

The circle is the obvious king of shapes, the sphere an emperor. Roundness is fullness, completeness, happiness, an answer to emptiness. A hole cannot be round—a hole is nothing. A zero is not round, it is only pretending. Alternatively, the reverse may be true.

An orbit is round. The slow spiral into the sun is round. An ellipse is round enough.

Round allows for transportation, for oiled ball-bearing movement, for spinning and whirling and motion. Round is never still. Round is a merry-go-itself.

Round is a problem for the art-installer, but it is usually worth it. It is the temporary but not forgotten structure for the embroiderer. It is a challenge for the painter and the drawer who feel the loss of corners. Roundness and smoothness are perfections, and therefore difficult to preserve. Where are circles supposed to be kept?

The sphere and the circle are deceptive in scale. Globes, beads, berries, stars, all round, and requiring context for their vastness.

Historically, mystically, Heaven and Earth are spheres, sea and sky the separation within them, hell being divided into circles. The year is marked by the completion of roundness moving around another roundness. It’s circles all the way down...

In honor of circles, and their roundness, we offer TONDO.

For this exhibit 142 artists submitted 513 works from 37 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C., and 7 countries, including Canada, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Sweden, Ukraine, and the United States. Thirty works by the following 20 artists from 13 states and 3 countries were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Matthew Ballou
Columbia, Missouri

James Betts
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Bob Bruch
Oberlin, Ohio

Robert Carpenter
Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Michael DeLuca
Moorestown, New Jersey

Patrick Gabler
Hamburg, Germany

David Harmon
Maize, Kansas

Alexandra Kiss
Toronto, Canada

Kent Krugh
Fairfield, Ohio

Radha Lakshmi
Cincinnati, Ohio

Dominic Lippillo
Starkville, Mississippi

Lake Roberson Newton
Memphis, Tennessee

Shelby Shadwell
Laramie, Wyoming

Mary Jo Toles
Cleveland, Ohio

Scott Turri
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Weiting Wei
Powell, Ohio

Bryan Whitney
New York, New York

Patrick Wilson
Kalamazoo, Michigan

Suzanne Wolfe
Honolulu, Hawaii

Emil Yanos
Napa, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Matthew Ballou


 

     Patrick Gabler


 

     Suzanne Wolfe


 


parallel space

 

PERCEPTUAL
Works Made from Direct Observation


“Anything under the sun is beautiful if you have the vision—it is the seeing of the thing that makes it so.”

– Charles Hawthorne 

 

In the early part of our lives as artists we learn that making art is somewhat less about the things that we make, and more about learning to see and wrestle with our comprehension of our subject. Early art instruction, particularly in drawing and painting, is often based on the idea that you should not respond what you think you see, but rather what you actually see. 

This puzzle is the crux of our first lesson that there is a truth in the world we observe that we can train ourselves to pay better attention to, and that our effort to let go of our preconceptions, to catch that truth, not necessarily to record it but to make a gesture at it, to pin down a piece of it, is a thing that makes for great art. 

With this in mind, PERCEPTUAL is an exhibit that primaries the artist’s process of perceiving their subject.

For this exhibit 73 artists submitted 287 works from 29 states, Puerto Rico, and 4 countries, including Canada, Portugal, Netherlands, and the United States. Seventeen works by the following 14 artists from 9 states and 3 countries were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Geoff Barnes
Sewickley, Pennsylvania

Cole Carothers
Milford, Ohio

Daniel Dallmann
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Brett Eberhardt
Providence, Rhode Island

Amy Erickson
Seattle, Washington

M Tobias Hall
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Alexandra Kiss
Toronto, Canada

Anne Lindberg
Wilmington, North Carolina

Daniel Riesmeyer
Thibodaux, Louisiana

Jaye Schlesinger
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Anna Maria Vargiu
Warffum, Netherlands

Christina Weaver
Clyde, North Carolina

Caitlin Winner
Craryville, New York

Taylor Woolwine
Shaker Heights, Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Cole Carothers


 

     Caitlin Winner


 

     Alexandra Kiss


 

 

 

 


central gallery

 

ONE 12
The 12th Annual Manifest Prizewinner

 


Studio Corner and Floor
oil on linen, 60 x 85 1/2", 2020

by Brett Eberhardt (Providence, Rhode Island)


Of his work the artist states:

"I have been painting floors for over 15 years now. I guess that means it has become an obsession—both an obsession of floors as painted images and the technical challenges of rendering them. The scratches, spills, residues and remnants of past activity on these surfaces engage the more profound thoughts I have about life and experience. Floors seem to bear and capture everything.

When I was fortunate enough to be able to rent a studio space separate from my home for the first time, it was the floors of the spaces that were auditioning. The visual scrutiny I have paid this floor has led me down a rabbit hole of observational inquiry and discovery too elaborate to relay here.

I would like to acknowledge Albert Flocon’s and André Barre’s Curvilinear Perspective: From Visual Space to the Constructed Image, which established the mathematical foundation for curvilinear perspective in 1968 and confirmed my own observations and strategies for sighting and measuring. Applying this intense system of observational examination to what may be widely considered an unremarkable and unworthy subject is an attempt to have the floor unfold in grand celebration of both painting and experience.

I would like to thank the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, The Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation, and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts whose generous financial support made this painting possible."

 

Brett Eberhardt was born in Lewiston, Idaho in 1974. He received his BFA in Painting and Woodworking from Northern Michigan University and his MFA in Painting from Syracuse University. Brett’s home and studio are in Providence, Rhode Island. He is an Assistant Professor of Painting at Manchester Community College in Connecticut. His work is exhibited nationally and represented by Kenise Barnes Fine Art in Kent, CT.



ABOUT THE $5,000 MANIFEST PRIZE

Five seasons ago our board of directors increased the Manifest Prize to $5,000. This underscored our non-profit organization's desire to reward, showcase, celebrate, and document exceptional artwork being made today by working artists, and to do this in a tasteful non-commercial public context. Manifest's mission is centered on championing the importance of quality in visual art, supporting and encouraging artists at all levels. This project is one aspect of the realization of that mission.

We respect the creative principle of reduction (the blind jury process) as it is employed to achieve an essential conclusive statement for each exhibit we produce. This is what has led to the high caliber of each Manifest exhibit, and to the gallery's notable following. We believe competition inspires excellence. Therefore we determined over a decade ago to launch the Manifest Prize in order to push the process to the ultimate limit—from among many to select just ONE work.

Manifest's jury process for the 12th Annual Manifest Prize included multiple levels of jury review of 771 works of all shapes, sizes, and media made by 172 artists from 35 states, Washington D.C., and 11 countries, including Canada, China, England, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Poland, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States. The jury consisted of a total of 23 different volunteer jurors from across the U.S. and beyond. Each level of the process resulted in fewer works passing on to the next, until a winner was reached. The size and physical nature of the works considered was not a factor in the jury scoring and selection.

It should be noted that the winner and finalists, 11 works, represent the top scoring 1% of the jury pool. The winner represents the top one-tenth of 1% of the jury pool.

The winning work will be presented in Manifest's Central Gallery from December 10, 2021 through January 7, 2022. It will be accompanied by excerpts from juror statements and the artist's statement.

The Finalists:

The Artists of the Ten Runner-up / Finalist Works will also be featured in the season-documenting Manifest Exhibition Annual publication (MEAs18). These are works by Ivan Albreht (Palmetto Bay, Florida), Justin Archer (Atlanta, Georgia), Tamie Beldue (Swannanoa, North Carolina), Patricia Bellan-Gillen (Burgettstown, Pennsylvania), Brett Eberhardt (Providence, Rhode Island), Andrew Leventis (Charlotte, North Carolina), Aaron M Shay (Canton, Ohio), and David Van Ness (Flagstaff, Arizona).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 


 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

12th Annual TAPPED
Artists and their Professors

The relationship between artists and their current or former instructors can be a powerful one. Even when this bond is left unstated, we carry our professors' voices forward in time as we mature as artists and people. We eventually realize that the instruction given by our teachers during our relatively brief careers as students continues to expand within us. We realize that the learning they inspired (or insisted upon) is a chain-reaction process that develops across our lifetime. All of us who have been students carry forward our teachers' legacy in one form or another. And those who are, or have been teachers, bear witness to the potency of studenthood.

Out of respect for this artist-teacher bond, and in honor of teachers working hard to help artists tap into a higher mind relative to art and life, Manifest is proud to  present TAPPED, an annual exhibit that presents paired works of art by current or former artist/teacher pairs.

For this exhibit 67 artists submitted 217 works from 26 states and 4 countries, China, Ireland, Italy, and the United States. Sixteen works by the following 14 artists from 10 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

The artists are listed in pairings to illustrate their teacher/student relationship (past or present). Works on view will include paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, collages, and photographs. The exhibition layout is planned so that each pair of artists' works will be shown side-by-side or in close proximity. Visitors will be able to enjoy the variety of types of works while also considering the nature of influence between professor and student.

It is worth noting also that at least one of the artists in the 'former student' category are now themselves working as a professor.

 

 

Professor Student

Jane Barrow
St. Louis, Missouri

Sutton Allen*
Fayetteville, Arkansas
Shelby Shadwell
Laramie, Wyoming
Amelia Borja
Azusa, California
Arron Foster
Kent, Ohio

Chandler Brutscher
Salem, Oregon

Sarah Sedwick
Eugene, Oregon
Sarah Calandro
Leander, Texas

Blake Praytor
Greenville, South Carolina

Samantha Goss
Greer, South Carolina

Perin Mahler
Laguna Beach, California

Jamie M Platt
South Point, Ohio
Ryan Horvath
Edwardsville, Illinois
Abbi Ruppert*
Westover, West Virginia
   
* current student  

 


 

 

 

 



 


Jane Barrow

Sutton Allen*

Shelby Shadwell

Amelia Borja

Arron Foster

Chandler Brutscher

Sarah Sedwick

Sarah Calandro

Blake Praytor

Samantha Goss

Perin Mahler

Jamie M. Platt

Ryan Horvath

Abbi Ruppert*

 

 

January 21 - February 18, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, January 20, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, January 21, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, February 17, 2022, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


THE FIVE THEMES PROJECT — For this fourth exhibit period of our 18th season Manifest has created a very special set of exhibitions for the third annual Five Themes Project—offering five concurrent interrelated shows. This iteration of the project explores the spectrum of places where humans learn about who they are and how they define (or are defined by) their environment relative to the larger world.

main gallery

 

WILDERNESS
Works Exploring the Beyond

 

(Part of the Season 18 Five Themes Project)

The wilderness is a place where we are not. Cities, farms, and neighborhoods grow with or through some kind of cultivation of nature—but there are places that we have not, cannot, maybe should not bring to heel. Wilderness is where the landscape remains bigger than us, primal, and virgin. The wilderness is where our surroundings are still mysterious and powerful—the wilderness is where we can still manage to disappear.

What kind of powerful, dangerous, and uncontrolled places remain?

For this exhibit 48 artists submitted 177 works from 23 states. Twenty works by the following 14 artists from 11 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

Presenting works by:

Dawn Waters Baker
Garland, Texas

William Batstone
Columbus, Ohio

Kariann Fuqua
Oxford, Mississippi

Travis Graves
Johnson City, Tennessee

Anthony Huang
Knoxville, Tennessee

Tonia Hughes
St. Joseph, Missouri

Melanie Johnson
Warrensburg, Missouri

Lynne Miller Jones
Evanston, Illinois

Aly Ogasian & Claudia O'Steen
Los Angeles, California

James Ostrander
South Bend, Indiana

Seana Reilly
Vienna, Virginia

Karen Rumora
Baltimore, Ohio

Matt Smith
Huntington, West Virginia

Elizabeth Weber
Little Rock, Arkansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Elizabeth Weber


 

     Aly Ogasian & Claudia O'Steen


 

     Travis Graves


 


drawing room

 

RURAL
Works Exploring the Countryside


(Part of the Season 18 Five Themes Project)

Living in the “countryside” is often framed, maybe romanticized, as a lifestyle more in touch with the land, historically because the settlements around it are supported by its cultivation. (How have the economics of rural living changed?) People here live more distantly, and accordingly develop different kinds of family and networks to relate. Distance creates new customs—conventionally a sense of independence and self-reliance. (What do we rely on rural communities for? What do rural communities rely on?) The landscape is a little more uninhabited, but it is still well-mapped and divided. What does a rural home look like? A rural school? A rural place of worship? A rural life? A rural philosophy?

Where does 'rural' begin and end?

For this exhibit 74 artists submitted 305 works from 27 states and 3 countries, Canada, England, and the United States. Fourteen works by the following 9 artists from 8 states and Canada were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Sean Caulfield
Edmonton, Canada

Leah Gose
Wichita Falls, Texas

Jason Lanegan
Spanish Fork, Utah

Natalie Pivoney
Batavia, Illinois

Thomas Stoffregen
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Caleb Stoltzfus
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Glenn Taylor
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Kathryn Yarkosky
Athens, Ohio

Chris Young
Los Angeles, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Sean Caulfield


 

     Jason Lanegan


 

     Chris Young


 

 

 

 


parallel space

 

SUBURBAN
Works Exploring Suburbia

(Part of the Season 18 Five Themes Project)

The suburbs encircle and bloom out from a city. Think of it like a circulatory system where cars, buses, and trains flow into a heart along highways and bridges, then are pumped back out in the evenings, past grocery stores and strip-malls and finally through the snaking, branching streets, ending in cul-de-sacs. It is the classic habitat of the "American Dream"; its markers, its symbols, are specific—lawn mowers, garages, apartment complex pools maybe, streets named for trees, communities named for forests or orchards they may or may not have supplanted, frames for unfinished houses—even if their particular aesthetics have changed.

What attracts us to this very in-between space, where you have neighbors to wave at, kids to play with, a job to drive to, and clearly drawn property lines?

Is this American Dream of suburbia just a pretty package for divide and conquer—a new opiate for the masses—not just limited to "America"? Or is it the natural evolution of a much more complex and perhaps even beautiful organism we cannot fully perceive but for which we all play a critical role—the outer fringes of an outstretched body of humanity?

For this exhibit 38 artists submitted 134 works from 19 states and Washington D.C. Fifteen works by the following 13 artists from 12 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Maddie Aunger
Lincoln, Nebraska

Chris Bergeron
Metairie, Louisiana

Brooks Cashbaugh
Iowa City, Iowa

Adam Crowley
Kansas City, Missouri

Richard J Diedrich
Naples, Florida

Kareem Obey
Seattle, Washington

Chris Offutt
Oxford, Mississippi

Shannon Pritchard
Indianapolis, Indiana

Tyler Thenikl
Athens, Ohio

James Wade
Lexington, Kentucky

Jake Wilson
Glen Carbon, Illinois

Roscoe Wilson
Hamilton, Ohio

Stephen Yuen
Honolulu, Hawaii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Maddie Aunger


 

     Chris Offutt


 

     James Wade


 

 


central gallery

 

URBAN
Works About the City, or City Life

(Part of the Season 18 Five Themes Project)

Cities grow, out and up. Mostly up. Cities are built new on top of old, old converted to new, sometimes for hundreds of years. The oldest cities may be whole civilizations deep. This density is its own kind of wilderness, though one made of bricks and concrete, rather than trees. Opportunities draw us to cities, and the connectivity they allow for often keeps us there. The concentration of human life—of shifting architectural design, of streets, of neighborhoods, of food, of languages and accents, of the spaces behind and between buildings, of the culture that thrives on deep talent pools—all of this creates distinct identities for each of our cities. 

What does it look like to have so much of human civilization concentrated on one spot? How does the City shape culture, everyday life, and the art of our time?

For this exhibit 42 artists submitted 161 works from 19 states and 4 countries, Canada, Japan, Slovakia, and the United States. Seventeen works by the following 11 artists from 9 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Dylan Bannister
Rock Hill, South Carolina

Miranda Brandon
Minneapolis, Minnesota

John Ferry
Prairie Village, Kansas

Christine Holtz
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Clayton Lewis
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Dereck Mangus
Baltimore, Maryland

Music X Habitat X Art
(Collaboration by Scott Lowell Sherman, Amelie Jiang,
and Yaoyue Huang)

Cincinnati, Ohio

Marlene Steele
Cincinnati, Ohio

Thomas Stoffregen
Saint Paul, Minnesota

Lydia Thompson
Charlotte, North Carolina

Raphael Warshaw
Gainesville, Virginia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Dylan Bannister


 

     John Ferry


 

     Marlene Steele


 

 

 

 


north gallery

 

POST URBAN
Works About What Comes Next

 

(Part of the Season 18 Five Themes Project)

What is going to change? 

Our planet is changing, and our policies, economics, interactions both on-and-off line, all of that will have to follow suit. How will our homes and lifestyles adapt? Is the future utopian, full of high-speed rails and sleek buildings? Will we bury one another under a new layer of history? How densely can we live? How separated can we be? Will our coastlines be swallowed up, and fires eat the wilds and neighborhoods alike? Will we migrate? To where? Can we stop it? How? 

What would that look like? How do creative ideas and expressions help resolve today's approaches to this future for the better?

For this exhibit 22 artists submitted 71 works from 15 states and 2 countries, Canada and the United States. Sixteen works by the following 10 artists from 9 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Jacob Crook
Starkville, Mississippi

Sarah Deppe
Madison, Wisconsin

Jesse Egner
Brooklyn, New York

Rebecca Harrell
Austin, Texas

Dawn Holder
Indianapolis, Indiana

John Homer
Ft. Thomas, Kentucky

Robert Jones
Ypsilanti, Michigan

Bob Mosier
Conroe, Texas

Mary Nees
Johnson City, Tennessee

Collin Richard
Manchester Center, Vermont

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Jesse Egner


 

     John Homer


 

     Robert Jones


 

 

 

 

March 4 - April 1, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, March 3, 7-9pm
–––––––––––––
Public Opening: Friday, March 4, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, March 31, 2022, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION   (TICKETS AVAILABLE HERE)

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


main gallery + drawing room

 

OHIO, KENTUCKY, INDIANA
Regional Showcase Exhibition

 

In 18 seasons Manifest's projects have included works by artists representing 50 states and 43 countries. Beginning in our tenth season, we launched an ongoing series of exhibits focusing on works by artists in our three-state region. Seven years ago we added projects that also focused on other definable regions outside our own. These Regional Showcases were offered to complement the very wide geographical makeup of most Manifest exhibits with a closer look at art being made here in our own backyard, as well as provide a platform from which we could examine the trends, qualities, and idiosyncrasies of contemporary art within specific geographical areas and compare them to our own.

This exhibit had no specific requirement for type, media, or style of work to be submitted. This was an open call. Submissions ranged widely from traditional to very conceptual, abstract, and experimental work. Jury selections were made based on the overall quality of the works submitted.

For this exhibit 190 artists submitted 745 works from Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio. Twenty-five works by the following 19 artists from our three-state region (6 from Indiana, 6 from Kentucky, and 7 from Ohio) were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Kelly Asbury
Cold Spring, Kentucky

Miriam Baranov
Columbus, Ohio

Edward Bernstein
Bloomington, Indiana

Katherine Brenner
Cincinnati, Ohio

Justin Carney
Bloomington, Indiana

Patty Flauto
Rocky River, Ohio

Ashley Pryor Geiger
Swanton, Ohio

Randall Godawa
Taylor Mill, Kentucky

Ron Isaacs
Lexington, Kentucky

Benjamin Lambert
Berea, Ohio

Damon Mohl
Crawfordsville, Indiana

Jordan Morgan
Goshen, Kentucky

Heidi Neumann
Lexington, Kentucky

David Ondrik
Bloomington, Indiana

Elvan Penny
Bowling Green, Kentucky

Kevin Rose Schultz
Floyds Knobs, Indiana

Dan Segal
Lakewood, Ohio

Sam Toland
Oxford, Ohio

Mark Van Buskirk
Richmond, Indiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Katherine Brenner


 

     Edward Bernstein


 

     Benjamin Lambert


 

 

parallel space

 

ORNAMENTAL
Works Exploring Aesthetics of Decoration

How can you tell when something is special?

Start with cake: there are cakes, and then there are wedding cakes. A wedding cake is covered with carefully designed icing, written on in cursive, adorned with edible flowers, glitter, stacked high in tiers and presented in the center of a table. Another example, a gift is a gift; a present comes with a bow.

To mark something as notable, we decorate it.  We nest special things in beauty.

Ornamental is an exhibit of works that explore the aesthetics of decoration, glamour, patterns, and surfaces.  

For this exhibit 77 artists submitted 283 works from 27 states and 2 countries, including Slovakia and the United States. Ten works by the following 10 artists from 8 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Eric Grasham
Denton, Texas

Jennifer Kirkpatrick
Youngstown, Ohio

Glover Marfo
Oxford, Ohio

Anthony Mead
Lexington, Kentucky

Anette Millington
Beacon, New York

Jessica Mohl
Crawfordsville, Indiana

Jane Nodine
Spartanburg, South Carolina

Tavia Sanza
Columbia, Missouri

Weiting Wei
Powell, Ohio

Suzanne Wolfe
Honolulu, Hawaii

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Tavia Sanza


 

     Anthony Mead


 

 

 


central gallery

 

ACCRETION
Sculpture & Prints by Bonnie Ralston

Bonnie Ralston is a visual artist living and working in NYC. Her process-driven sculpture and works on paper serve as a record of personal inquiry into identity and transformation, and bring attention to the beauty and potential of the everyday and the overlooked. The natural sciences provide inspiration and departure points for her work: she explores topics as varied as invertebrate metamorphosis and geologic time.

Secondary schooling led Ralston to believe that her passions for art and science could not be combined nor pursued concurrently. So when college applications came due, Ralston chose fine art over environmental science.

The BFA she earned in 1996 from Hartford Art School launched a successful career in graphic design that eventually led Ralston, in 2002, to work for The Museum of Modern Art. Immersed in and influenced by the canon of modern and contemporary art that surrounded her, Ralston refined her own aesthetic while gaining the equivalent of a graduate degree in modern art history. For seven years, she collaborated with artists, curators, and museum educators on exhibitions and printed ephemera until the call of the wild became too great to ignore.

In 2009, she left her life and job in NYC to follow 1,685 miles of white blazes on the Appalachian Trail. During those six months, she reconnected to herself and to her love for the natural world. Her return to NYC marked the end of her 15-year design career and the beginning of a second career in environmental education. Through her MS coursework at Lesley University’s Ecological Teaching and Learning program, Ralston came to understand the interconnectedness of art and science, and more importantly, that she did not have to abandon either. In 2016, she resumed a regular studio practice merging her love for both.

Ralston’s work has been included in exhibitions nationwide and is in private collections in Connecticut and New York. She is the founder of the fledgling artist-run event collective Gowanus Night Heron, which hosted its first two events in 2021. She also serves as the Director of Teaching & Learning Support for NYC Parks.

 

Of her work the artist states:

"I am fascinated by states of change and the continual act of becoming, which New York City streets, sidewalks, and buildings display in excess. My visual inspiration comes from these moments that reveal the built environment softening and giving way to time, wear, and the natural processes that govern us all.

The intrinsic limitations of my chosen media—street refuse, clay, oxides, salt, and water—challenge me to engage fully with what is in front of me. Not unlike a scientist seeking ultimate truths, the promise of discovery (about materials, process, and self) drives my practice.



This exhibition was selected from among 128 proposals submitted in consideration for Manifest’s 18th season.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   


 

    

 

 

 

 



north gallery

 

MARK
Works Focused on Mark Making

Art builds from a touch: pen to paper, light to sensor, tool to medium, brush to canvas. That touch leaves behind a signature, the mark, the most fundamental impression of the artist’s contact with the work. These impressions can exist on their own or be used to build something greater than its parts, but still given life by them. 

MARK is an exhibit about the artist’s hand, the signature left by the maker’s tool, and the energy it contains.

For this exhibit 136 artists submitted 538 works from 36 states, Washington D.C., and 5 countries, including Canada, England, France, India, and the United States. Twenty-one works by the following 17 artists from 11 states and 3 countries were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Bartosz Beda
Dallas, Texas

Pirjo Berg
Grand Forks, North Dakota

Jake Boggs
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

Michael Bonardi
Columbus, Ohio

David Clark
Wheat Ridge, Colorado

Martie Geiger-Ho
Bradford, Pennsylvania

Gianluca Giarrizzo
Harleysville, Pennsylvania

Daniel Gluibizzi
Elmwood Park, New Jersey

Tracy Hill
Warrington, England

Tony Holmquist
Durango, Colorado

Kelly Isaak
Calgary, Canada

Patti Jordan
Montclair, New Jersey

Felicia Leach
Columbia, Missouri

Ryan O'Malley
Corpus Christi, Texas

William Potter
Indianapolis, Indiana

Sabrina Sabella
Elmwood Park, Illinois

Travis Schmiesing
San Francisco, California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Sabrina Sabella


 

     Bartosz Beda


 

 

 

April 15 - May 13, 2022  

Ticketed Preview: Thursday, April 14, 7-9pm

Public Opening: Friday, April 15, 6-9pm

Moderated Artists Panel Talk and Conversation (Closing Reception): Thursday, May 12, 2022, 6-8pm
ONLINE EVENT - FREE ADMISSION

MANIFEST VR WALKTHROUGH — Social Distancing Exhibit Experience (link here to full screen view)


main gallery + drawing room

 

DRAWN
9th Annual International Exhibition of Contemporary Drawing

Manifest was founded in-part to stand for the importance of drawing as a process, skill, and discipline, and as a continuing viable product of the creative fine art and design fields. Since its inception our nonprofit organization has continued to incorporate drawing-based programming, including education (Drawing Center), publications (INDA), and gallery exhibits into the broader spectrum of its projects. The artists who formed Manifest in 2004 knew that despite their diverging career paths (architecture, art history, painting, industrial design, photography) they were brought together by their connection to drawing and their mutually intense but multi-faceted pursuit of this fundamental discipline. 

In honor of the original spirit of the founding ideals of Manifest, the gallery launched DRAWN almost a decade ago as an annual exhibition. DRAWN seeks to survey and present the broad scope of drawing being made today. This gallery exhibit is completely separate from but nevertheless complements, and sometimes shares work in common with, the now triennial INDA publication project

DRAWN called for artists to submit works of drawing in any media relevant to the practice (including non-traditional approaches), any style, and any genre (fine art, illustration, design, conceptual, realism, etc.).

For this exhibit 167 artists submitted 616 works from 38 states and 10 countries including Australia, Canada, China, England, India, Italy, Mexico, Northern Ireland, Portugal, and the United States. Twenty-four works by the following 17 artists from 11 states and 3 countries were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Roger Derrick
Long Branch, New Jersey

Samantha Haring
Cincinnati, Ohio

Judith Berk King & Bryan Hiveley
Miami Shores, Florida

Christine Kirouac
Winnipeg, Canada

Robert Long
Flagstaff, Arizona

Paige Martin
Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Ben Moreau
Seattle, Washington

Joe Morzuch
Starkville, Mississippi

Anthony Pessler
Phoenix, Arizona

Michael Reedy
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Alberto Repetti
Genova, Italy

Janvier Rollande
Harpswell, Maine

Chris Sancomb
Peacedale, Rhode Island

Amy Schissel
Miami, Florida

Shelby Shadwell
Cincinnati, Ohio

Kathleen Thum
Central, South Carolina

Lee Waldman
Cleveland Heights, Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Michael Reedy


 

     Amy Schissel


 

parallel space

 

PORTAL
Doorways & Openings

A doorway is the necessary afterthought of making a place, but one that takes on a great deal of importance once you realize that you need it—simply passing though a portal changes your experience of the other side. You are awed by a foreboding entryway, you forget your reason for entering a room after walking through a doorway. You intimately experience a movie through the phone in your hand.

Passing through, or looking through, the framework of a portal sets the tone for the experience within.

PORTAL called to artists everywhere for works of any kind, for an exhibition of that which separates and encloses the movement of inside to out—doorways, windows, frames, lenses, all the means by which we leave one space or state and enter another.

For this exhibit 171 artists submitted 628 works from 37 states and 5 countries, including Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, and the United States. Eleven works by the following 9 artists from 7 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Steven Carrelli
Chicago, Illinois

Katherine Colborn
Cincinnati, Ohio

Jacob Docksey
St. Paul, Minnesota

Corey Drieth
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Peter Hildebrand
Brooklyn, New York

Rhea Nowak
Oneonta, New York

Chris Sancomb
Peacedale, Rhode Island

Lisa Schenkelberg
Shaker Heights, Ohio

Amy Schissel
Miami, Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Lisa Schenkelberg


 

     Peter Hildebrand


 


central gallery

 

NOTIONS & IMPRESSIONS
Mixed-Media Photo Based Works by
Morgan Ford Willingham

Morgan Ford Willingham is a photographic artist and educator. After receiving an MFA in photography from Texas Woman’s University, she moved to the Midwest to pursue a career in academia and art making. Morgan explores pop culture, advertising, societal norms, and historical representations to better understand its influence on women, and their identity and self-image, using various mediums, including photography, book arts, and installation. Morgan's work has been widely exhibited, including Humble Arts Gallery in NYC, Filter Photo in Chicago, and the Hite Institute of Art in Louisville, KY. She is currently Associate Professor of Photography at Emporia State University in Kansas.

 

Of her work the artist states, in-part:

"Examining and reflecting upon the mother-child relationship, from the attempts to raise a child and to shape what their future holds, to the ways in which the child forges their own path, these domestic portraits of my daughter and me attest to the selfhood, uncertainty, and parallels that are threaded between us. The images independently and collectively signify the intimate daily circumstances, and the historical and cultural influences that shape us both as individuals and as a familial unit.



This exhibition was selected from among 128 proposals submitted in consideration for Manifest’s 18th season.

 

 

 

 

   

    

 

 

 



north gallery

 

DIPTYCH/TRIPTYCH
Works Made of Two or Three Parts

An idea can call for multiplicity—you can’t always say everything in one image, one object. It is sometimes better, then, to work with an orchestra instead of a soloist.

Diptychs and triptychs are traditional modes for an artist to use multiples in their work, each with their own histories and idiosyncrasies. Two images together can present dichotomy, an either/or, a balance, an alternative. The triptych pulls the viewer into the realm of sequence, of beginning, middle, and end, of the central work flanked by attendant handmaidens.

For this exhibit 167 artists submitted 541 works from 34 states and 4 countries, including Barbados, Canada, Russia, and the United States. Eleven works by the following 7 artists from 6 states were selected by a blind jury process for presentation in the gallery and the Manifest Exhibition Annual publication.

 

Presenting works by:

Patricia Bacon
Lyons, New York

John Yoyogi Fortes
Sacramento, California

Serge Hamad
Fort Lee, New Jersey

Robert Jinkins
Belmont, Wisconsin

Rose Schlemmer
Menomonie, Wisconsin

D.L. Simmons
Flint, Texas

Thomas Stoffregen
Saint Paul, Minnesota

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Patricia Bacon


 

     John Yoyogi Fortes


 

     Tom Stoffregen


 

 

 

 

 

——— END OF SEASON 18  ———  THANK YOU!


See all open calls here.



  Season Funder:

Manifest's 18th season is funded in part by a grant from the Josephine S. Russell Charitable Trust, PNC Bank, Trustee. This season's programming is also supported by the generosity of tens of thousands of contributors to the ArtsWave Community Campaign, by a sustainability grant from the Ohio Arts Council, and through the generous direct contributions of individual supporters and private foundations who care deeply about the visual arts.


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